When Immigration Matters

White House Leaks President Obama's Immigration Reform Early

Posted by Karen-Lee Pollak on Thu, Nov 20, 2014 @ 3:51 PM

executive action; immigration reformExtracts of President Obama's Immigration Action have been leaked by the White House.docs/White-House-Details-on-Anticipated-Administrative-Relief.pdf  Essentially, you must pass criminal and background checks, pay taxes and a fee and show the following:

are a parent of a US. citizen or lawful permanent resident on the date of the announcement and have been in the USA since January 1 2010

or

  • are an individual who arrived in the USA before turning 16 and before January 1 2010 regardless of how old they are 
The Government also states it will reduce wait times that families are separated while obtaining green cards.  Undocumented immigrants who are immediate relatives of lawful permanent residents or sons and daughters of US citizens can apply to get a waiver if a visa is available.  
You must have been in the USA for at least 5 years to qualify for these programs.  Recent border crosses are ineligible (defined as entering after Jan 1, 2014)
The Government will not begin accepting applications until early 2015.

Immigration Reform Bill is Here!!!

Posted by Karen-Lee Pollak on Wed, Apr 17, 2013 @ 9:50 AM
comprehensive immigration reform, CIRAs a framework for reform, this is closer than we've come in years to meaningful change," said AILA President Laura Lichter

We commends the Senate "Gang of Eight" for introducing its bipartisan immigration reform proposal, allowing the Senate Judiciary Committee to forge ahead on the "markup" process. A proposal like this is a necessary first step in any path forward to create a common-sense immigration system that will meet the needs of the U.S. economy, businesses, and families, and integrate into our society aspiring Americans who work hard and want only a better life for themselves and their families.

http://www.schumer.senate.gov/forms/immigration.pdf

In many ways, the language contained in the 844 page legislation reflects key issues AILA sees as necessary to any successful immigration reform, such as border and interior enforcement, legalization, backlog reduction, asylum, family unification, and both current and future business needs.

"Is it perfect? No compromise measure ever is. Is it a good bill? Yes, for the most part it is, and perhaps it is even a great bill in some respects. We do see some further changes that are desirable, and as we delve more deeply into the details, I'm sure we'll find some needed tweaks. But as a framework for reform, this is closer than we've come in years to meaningful change," said AILA President Laura Lichter. She continued, "This bill does not shy away from addressing the difficult issues embedded in current immigration policy. It's a good start, and I hope that by continuing to work across the aisle, the Senate can pass a bill that will meet our nation's needs and the House will follow suit."

Immigration Relief for Japanese Nationals in the United States

Posted by Karen Pollak on Sat, Mar 26, 2011 @ 12:35 PM

Following the devastating earthquake and tsunami in Japan, the country has faced growing concerns about the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant and a rising death toll that has now surpassed 10,000.

immigration lawyer dallas txIn the midst of this crisis, the Department of Homeland Security has addressed options for Japanese nationals who are in the United States. U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement announced this week that it will temporarily halt removals of Japanese nationals. Additionally, USCIS has issued information regarding the immigration options and applications available to assist Japanese nationals to extend their stay in the United States. Some options available will depend on how an individual last entered the U.S., as well as their current status, and may include extensions of nonimmigrant status, parole, and expedited processing of family petitions, employment authorization and other applications. We want to alert you to information on the options available for Japanese nationals in the United States available through the Immigration Advocates Network (IAN), our partners, and other advocates.

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